Sunday, October 3, 2010

TONGUE TWISTERS HELP TEACH PHONICS!

Read the tongue twister several times to students, both at a regular rate and slowly. Ask them to listen for a sound they hear repeatedly. Have them repeat the tongue twister in its entirety. Or, if the tongue twister is long, students may repeat the sentence in segments as an echo after you have said it.

Listening to the tongue twisters will help students develop phonemic awareness as they repeatedly hear the same beginning sound in close proximity. As they listen for this sound, their brains become pattern detectors. Hearing and repeating the tongue twisters will help students to hear the sounds in speech and then reproduce them. These oral-mode experiences build the foundation for a student’s ability to look at the tongue twisters and then recognize the same letters in print (phonics).

HERE ARE SOME EXAMPLES:
Annie asked Alex to draw an apple.
Billy watched the beaver build a dam with bunches of branches.
Celia’s class celebrated the new century at City Center in
Cincinnati.
Cassidy carries cauliflower, carrots, and corn in a colorful cart.
Logan likes limes, lettuce, lemons, and lots of licorice.

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2 comments:

Susanne Drazic said...

Tongue twisters are fun. Try saying "seven silent swans swam swiftly" ten times fast. That was one we used to say as kids.

Anonymous said...

Interesting!

I like this tip. We will be trying out this in our classes for a few days.

george

http://learnbysoft.blogspot.com/